Category Archives: Cleaning Issues and advice

An Extra Argument For Ahok Winning the Jakarta Governor Election

Ahok

His Excellency Ir. Basuki Tjahaja Purnama is up for re-election for Governor of DKI, the Greater Jakarta Area. With already an impressive track record of his successes in his current tenure, he is up to pursue even better results in the second leg of his governorship. The Jakarta inhabitants did not experience the results from flattering articles in newpapers, but especially in their day to day life. For instance no extreme banjirs (floods) occurred in Jakarta in the last three years. Like his predecessor, and now president, Jokowi, does in his government is cleaning up the ‘swamp’, including cleaning of the rivers, the canals and the sewers. Not in the Trump way by doing the contrary, but with a professional approach looking at the results of the city administration and of the results of the city services to the citizens.

To change something in a large city administration is more difficult than draining the swamp. We do not argue that an administration is a swamp, only that it is for the Governor difficult to determine what works and what is ‘fake’ in a large city administration.

Much has been done already by digitalizing several services. One counter for various services was developed. Manpower is accounted for with entry and exit registration systems. But what in the working time is carried out is sometimes or maybe often unclear. In the old days of Philips Telecommunication Systems in The Netherlands office staff ran regularly with files through the office corridors to demonstrate that they were busy. Would that be different in Jakarta?

Our advice to Pak Ahok for JKT: Buy a Facility Software System that follows the work process and monitors the results on site, implement it and show the citizens that this works for them. Better maintenance, better services and better cleaning.

Forgive us that we are a bit commercial and recommend our InPRC Facility Software System to Pak Ahok. Are there alternative systems, probably not.

We are not going to print our brochure but we will show you that it works. How about the TransJakarta buses as an example? With more than 600 new buses driving on the Jakarta corridors it is supplying a terrific good service to the JKT citizens.

But what about maintenance? We see before a Ramadhan exodus on television a smiling civil servant with pen and paper register possible malfunctions of buses from a private company. Does he really belief that those buses are then safe for a long journey? Have InPRC use for that and we show you why!

wieldraf

How does it work?

In our InPRC Facility Software System we prepared a try out account. In this account we imported data from Zhongton buses, Hino buses and Scania buses. We added some data from several Haltes. We estimated the square meters (M2) and the calculation of maintenance and cleaning time. We wrote and calculated working programs for daily and periodical maintenance and for daily and periodical cleaning. We identified and imported potential malfunctions and errors. The software system produced unique barcodes for every bus and activity. The barcodes for the buses have to be attached in the driver area, at the stations and at the haltes. The barcodes for the maintenance and cleaning programs are on the lists for the maintenance and cleaning staff. Assessors use their own lists of assessment reasons. Maintenance staff and assessors use a hand scanner to register maintenance issues, work progress, results and quality. Easy to use and easy data upload on any computer with internet connection. All data can be monitored by senior staff, perform benchmarking, and adjust policy and working instructions when needed. The InPRC Facility Software System is established in ‘online’ ‘clientapplications’. It contains of smart software and intelligent logarithms and can be used for unlimited application options.

The options for use of this InPRC facility Software System in JKT are unlimited. To mention a few which will ultimately benefit citizens:

Inspections and reporting on restoration of road facilities (benefits citizens)

Quality inspection and reporting of urban cleaning services (benefits citizens)

Delivery inspections and reporting of outsourced contracts (benefits citizens)

Registration and inspections of administrative matters for citizens (benefits citizens)

Transparency and Accountability

With all data available for everybody involved a maximum of transparency is the result, a benefit which should not be underestimated.

Some of the results of our ‘ bus try out’ client can be observed hereafter:

The website: http://www.inprc.nl/en/

List of the used barcodes

jkt-barcode-list

List of Assessments

jkt-assessments

Pre Calculation and Duration String

jkt-pre-calculation-and-duration-string

Compare Pre- and Post Calculations

jkt-compare-pre-and-post-calculation-per-unit

List Halte Assessments

halte-assessments

List Halte Assessment/AQL

jkt-halte-assessment-aql

List of Disruptions

jkt-disruptions

List of Assessments/AQL

jkt-assessment-aql

It should be noted that all data in this ‘try out’ in the client application’ are based on assumptions. All the spaces in this example have estimated surface areas (M2), work programs, and calculations. The records of the working hours are virtually taken with a hand scanner from a barcode list, and not from barcodes that would be attached to the different buses, stations and haltes. The reports about the scanning of “assessments” and “disturbances” do not reflect reality but are only intended as “demo material’.

At a request with serious interest we will submit a temporarily login and password for access to the try out ‘clientapplication’ (please contact us at info@cleaningworks.nl ).

InPRC (InProcesRegieConcept) Facility Software System. Patented by NL 1033348

Keyboards, Remote Controls, Buffet en Restroom Contamination

What are the similarities between: Keyboard of a computer, Your computer keyboard, Handles of a cart, Handles of luggage, Remote control at home, Remote control elsewhere, Audio / video selector on a plane and Faucets, flush handles, door handles in restrooms?

First similarity: All mentioned components are seldom clean or never get cleaned.

Second similarity: All mentioned components contain attached dirt. This attached dirt may consist of: feces, semen, blood, nose residue, skin oil, sweat and other dirt.

Okay, so what, I wash my hands before I go get a meal!

What about your meal in buffet style. We can assume that the cutlery has passed the dishwasher and that the catering staff has washed their hands. However, you are not alone in holding the spoons and forks to fill your plate! The later you enjoy this buffet the greater is the likelihood that these components show dirt.

However, “show” is an incorrect term here, at the most you feel stickiness and experience the urge to wash your hands. The table edge or the chair which you touch accidentally you feel that they have not been cleaned recently, the confirmation you will show when you carefully look at these parts.

If, after so much unpleasant inspiration, urges arise to wash your hands in the toilets, remember the golden rule: “after washing your hands do not touch faucet, door or flush buttons, because otherwise you might be better of with not washing your hands. In summary, thoroughly hand washing, dry with paper towel, then close the tap with the paper. No paper available? Don’t dry your hands at all. Leave the restroom without touching anything.

Why this advice? The cleaning program will surely include cleaning these parts? Certainly, however without supervision there is no guarantee that it happens! Moreover, it is not easy to check or measure that the cleaning and disinfection of these components have been carried out.

Is this all dangerous to human health? Exception of bacteria and viruses that the WHO has declared as highly contagious it is not so bad. Your body has developed a fantastic ‘immune’ system in the last million years for anything foreign. The countless and constant attacks at the skin, mouth and wounds on your physical integrity are brilliantly approached by this system.

The quality of the ‘acid’ in the stomach notes with pleasure the challenge of the shawarma sandwich you decided to swallow, the meat itself full of living bacteria moving them selves around the heating carousel.

In a situation when you stomach protection cannot cope with the new arrivals, at most the stool, instead of the usual color and firmness, shall appear by means of a rapid, often unannounced, blast and ruin the entire toilet area.

The relief on your part makes you feel much better and a professional cleaner sees no problem to get the cleaning job done. Ready for next use. Have a good Day!

Improving the Airport Customer Experience

This report number acrp_rpt_157 replaces the draft that was published earlier

Improving the Airport Customer Experience

Part of the Airport Cooperate Research Program Report nr. 157

One of the sections addresses cleanliness:

8.1 Cleanliness and Janitorial/Maintenance

A statistical study of the drivers of airport satisfaction and dissatisfaction based on a content analysis of 1,095 traveler comments on an airport review website concluded that key drivers of customer satisfaction included terminal cleanliness and a pleasant environment (Bogicevic et al. 2013). Key drivers of dissatisfaction included security inspection, confusing signage and way finding, and poor dining choices. Other surveys, including those conducted by ASQ and Skytrax, indicate that terminal cleanliness, especially of restrooms, is a core indicator of customer satisfaction. According to ACI, cleanliness remains one of the most important items for passengers and is a basic requirement for satisfaction (personal communication).

The appearance of cleanliness is harder to maintain in an older facility. Worn surfaces, poor lighting, older xtures and furnishings, darker color schemes, and unchecked growth in permanent and temporary signage make it harder to maintain an image of cleanliness and order in older terminals and can give the appearance of a lack of cleanliness in spite of the best efforts of janitorial staff and increased maintenance spending.

Customer feedback mechanisms (discussed in Chapter 3) can be applied to determine how customers perceive the cleanliness of the terminal (and restrooms). Feedback cards, touch-screen and kiosk-based surveys taken in the restroom and terminals, text messages, Twitter, ASQ, and other ongoing user feedback mechanisms, as well as focus groups and web surveys, are proven techniques that can be applied to assessing customer perceptions of cleanliness. Tools such as these may be helpful in prioritizing the use of limited funds for terminal renewals and replacements.

Where the problem may indeed be janitorial maintenance, airports can benchmark their cost per square foot of janitorial expense against peer airports and determine if they are getting a good return on their expense. It may be necessary to adjust schedules, increase staf ng during peak

periods, or perform deferred maintenance in order to improve cleanliness scores (as determined by benchmarking) to acceptable levels. Restrooms are particularly important as drivers of customer satisfaction.

8.15 Restrooms

Survey research on customer satisfaction has established a direct link between the quality and cleanliness of restrooms and the overall customer experience. Recent common practices in restroom design include:

  • Removing doors at entrances to restrooms. Most airports have created doorless entries to restrooms. Doors are an impediment to travelers burdened with carry-on baggage or children.
  • Brightening up entrances. Restroom entryways do not have to look institutional and serious. Entrances, like restroom interiors, are being upgraded to include art, graphics, and use of color and lighting.
  • Hotel-style restrooms. When San Francisco International Airport was designing its com- pletely redeveloped Terminal 2, it conducted considerable research into what makes a good restroom and developed what it calls hotel-style restrooms. SFO’s restrooms are bright and have lots of indirect lighting, which appears less harsh than direct lighting. Lighting is placed around mirrors to improve visibility, and women’s restrooms include seating so women can apply makeup and take advantage of the mirrored lighting. High-speed air dryers are mounted between sinks to reduce water dripping on the oor. Light materials are used, but dark materials are used on countertops to downplay the look of water on counters around sinks. Toilet partitions are larger to accommodate carry-on bags. The reactions were so positive that SFO now includes its upgraded restroom program in all future terminal projects. Other airports with hotel-quality restrooms are perennial leaders Singapore Changi, Seoul Incheon, and Hong Kong.
  • Using quality materials. As restrooms age, materials tend to crack and discolor. These materials look dirty, and no amount of cleaning can brighten them. Use of long-lasting materials will keep the restrooms looking good for longer. Cheap xtures, particularly those with sensors, are more likely to leak or fail.

Some airports have adopted standards designed to ensure that restrooms remain open to meet demand. Portland International Airport designs its new restrooms with two entrances so that one part can be blocked for cleaning without closing the entire restroom. This is particularly important where larger restrooms are used and the next nearest restroom is far away.

Adequate storage closets and sinks for janitorial staff are a necessity. If the cleaning staff cannot readily access the buckets, mops, and cleaning materials they need, there will be less time to clean the restrooms.

Customer feedback on how well restrooms are meeting their needs can be obtained through a variety of means, including:

    • Comment cards and drop boxes.
    • Touch-screen ratings. Singapore Changi has installed touch screens where passengers can rate the restroom using a ve-point scale. Geneva Airport has a mechanized feedback counter where passengers push a red, yellow, or green button to indicate their satisfaction with the visit to the restroom.
    • Customer surveys, including ASQ and local periodic customer surveys, can solicit overall ratings of restrooms.
    • Twitter or text. A number of airports post a Twitter address or a number where customers can text their reactions to restroom conditions. This can also allow for quick reaction to pressing cleaning needs.

According to ACI, one in three airports in the world has instant feedback tools in washrooms to measure satisfaction with cleanliness. In North America, this statistic is one in ve. Seven of 10 airports worldwide collect real-time feedback on specific items such as availability of soap and toilet paper. Three out of four airports with real-time feedback tools dispatch cleaning staff once they receive alerts of a bad customer experience with restrooms. According to ACI, cleanliness of washrooms/toilets is very important across all passenger pro les (personal communication with ACI).

8.15.1 Restroom Attendants

Charlotte-Douglas International Airport (CLT) initiated a program in 2006 to improve customer service by adding restroom attendants. The airport hires employees using a local company that specializes in job placement for workers with disabilities. The attendants are responsible for keeping the restrooms clean and provide optional amenities such as tissues, mouthwash and paper cups, and mints. A tip tray is visible, but tipping is optional. The airport tried the restroom attendant program on a trial basis and continued the program after receiving many positive comments about the cleanliness of the restrooms.

The restrooms at CLT are clean and stocked, especially during busy periods. Some passengers, however, are put off by the presence of the attendant and by the tip tray since it is unusual to find attendants in restrooms in all but the most exclusive restaurants and private clubs. Nevertheless, the complaints about restroom conditions dropped, and the program is considered successful by the airport. As a connecting hub with heavy traffic during peaks, keeping the restrooms tidy and in order is no longer a major issue.

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Cooperative Research Programs (CRP)

Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein.

Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB, AASHTO, FAA, FHWA, FMCSA, FRA, FTA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Technology, PHMSA, or TDC endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP.

 

 

 

Improving the Airport Customer Experience

TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) has released a pre-publication, non-edited draft version of Report 157: Improving the Airport Customer Experience. The guidebook documents notable and emerging practices in airport customer service management that increase customer satisfaction, recognizing the different types of customers (such as passengers, meeters and greeters, and employees) and types and sizes of airports. It also identifies potential improvements that airports could make for its customers.

acrp_rpt_157

COPYRIGHT

Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein. 
Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply endorsement by TRB and any of its program sponsors of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP.

Key Figures Cleaning: Get them yourself!

Suppose you are looking for key indicators in the cleaning. So you are going to search the internet. The results will be advertisements of books on key figures. Cleaning companies who explain that they have key indicators in their business and do something with it. A cleaning consultant does not want to give you key figures because that is their trade. That means you get nothing to work with.

Maybe you should not want to have those commercial key indicators. They have nothing to offer other than general references to production experiences which are not measured in a scientific way. In a tender you can also see key figures. However, these are not usually tested in practice but are more in line with the market.

Get the key figures yourself! Take a license InPRC (www.inprc.nl)

Give any room and space in your building a unique barcode and let the cleaners scan the area prior to cleaning.

After several months you have the key figures for cleaning for your building applied in any area and space. No consultancy needed. You yourself have become expert and knows more about the cleanliness of your building than any cleaning company or cleaning advisor.

The license fee you will recoup within one, at most two years, apart from the superfluity to make costs of hiring a cleaning consultant.

More information? Please contact Victor van der Wal (victor.vanderwal@inprc.nl) or Hans Westerveld (johanwesterveld@me.com ).

Kengetallen Schoonmaak: Je gaat zelf zorgen voor schoonmaak kengetallen

Stel je bent op zoek naar kengetallen in de schoonmaak. Je gaat dus een zoekmachine raadplegen. Wat het oplevert zijn advertenties van boeken over kengetallen en informatie van schoonmaakbedrijven die uitleggen dat zij over kengetallen beschikken en daar in hun bedrijfsvoering iets mee doen. Ook een schoonmaak adviseur levert jou die kengetallen niet want dat is zijn handel. Daar heb je dus niks aan.

Misschien moet je die kengetallen ook niet willen hebben. Wat ze te bieden hebben zijn niet meer dan algemene referenties naar productie ervaringen die niet op een wetenschappelijke wijze zijn gemeten. In een offerte zie je ook kengetallen. Deze zijn echter meestal niet getoetst aan ervaringen in de productie maar aan markt conformiteit.

Regel schoonmaak kengetallen zelf. Neem een licentie van InPRC (www.inprc.nl)

Geef elke ruimte in jouw gebouw een unieke barcode en laat de schoonmakers de ruimte scannen voorafgaand aan de schoonmaak.

Na een aantal maanden heb je de kengetallen die voor jouw gebouw van toepassing zijn voor elke ruimte die je laat schoonmaken. Geen adviesbureau meer nodig. Je bent zelf deskundige geworden en weet meer over het schoonhouden van jouw gebouw dan elk schoonmaakbedrijf of schoonmaak adviseur.

De licentie kosten verdien je binnen één, hoogstens twee, jaar terug, afgezien van de overbodigheid om kosten te maken voor het inschakelen van een schoonmaak adviseur voor de schoonmaak calculaties.

Meer informatie? Neem contact op met Victor van der Wal victor.vanderwal@inprc.nl of met Hans Westerveld (johanwesterveld@me.com ).

Cleaning Requirements at Airports

WORK SPECIFICATIONS CHECKLIST FOR CLEANING

Summary of cleaning requirements

Guide to Hygiene and Sanitation in Aviation

A Report from the WHO (2013)

guide_hygiene_sanitation_aviation_3_edition_wcov

A Guide to Better Public Toilet Design and Maintenance

Publication by the Restroom Association (Singapore)

GuideBetterPublicToilet

Lessons Learned from Airport Sustainability Plans

A study from the Airport Cooperative Research Program. Check it before you print it.

http://onlinepubs.trb.org/Onlinepubs/acrp/acrp_syn_066.pdf

COPYRIGHT INFORMATION

Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein.

Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB or FAA endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP.

Advice on cleaning issues